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Johannes Kepler University (JKU)

The Johannes Kepler University (JKU) is a public university in Linz, the capital of Upper Austria. JKU is a leading research-focused higher education institution. The Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences was established in 1969, currently holding more than 60 institutes in mathematics, computer science, chemistry, mechatronics and physics. Research in the faculty is coordinated within the Linz Institute of Technology and three excellence clusters. The Soft Matter Physics Department (SoMaP) within the Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences of the JKU was founded in 2002, the Soft Materials Lab (SML) within the Linz Institute of Technology in 2019.

The research focus of the team is on flexible, stretchable and imperceptible electronics, transducers, soft batteries and combinations of electronics, transducers and batteries to stand alone soft and implantable electronics and soft machines for biomimetic and bioelectronic applications.

JKU Partecipant

Martin Kaltenbrunner

Kaltenbrunner is a full professor at the Johannes Kepler University, heading the Soft Matter Physics Department and the LIT Soft Materials Lab. He received his master’s and PhD degrees in physics from the Johannes Kepler University in 2008 and 2012, respectively. He then joined the Someya-Sekitani Lab for Organic Electronics at The University of Tokyo as postdoctoral researcher prior to his present position. Kaltenbrunner’s research interests include soft electronics and machines, biodegradable soft materials, photovoltaics, lightning and thin film transistors, soft transducers and robotics, flexible and stretchable electronics, and electronic skin.


David Schiller

David Schiller graduated with a Master degree in Physics from the Johannes Kepler University Linz in 2019. His work at the Soft Matter Physics division focussed on stretchable electronics, in particular on soft batter packs for wearable healthcare devices. He currently is a PhD student at SoMap within "Lion Hearted". His research interests are soft and stretchable devices, light sources and bioelectronic interfaces.

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 FETOPEN 2018-2020 programme under grant agreement No 828984.
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